Here’s a sure-fire way to know that you hate women: when an incident of intimate partner violence in which a man knocks a woman unconscious gains national attention and every question or comment you think to make has to do with her behavior, you really hate women. Like, despise.

There is no other explanation. There is no “I need all the facts.” There is no excuse. You hate women. Own it.

Now, you probably don’t believe you hate women. You probably honestly think you’re being an objective observer whose only interest is the truth. You are delusional.

We have this problem in our discourse around the most important challenges we face where we feel we have to be “fair to both sides.” But sometimes, one of those sides is subjugation and oppression. If you’re OK with legitimizing that side in the interest of “fairness,” you’re essentially saying you’re OK with oppression as a part of the human condition. That’s some hateful shit.

— Mychal Denzel Smith | How to know that you hate women (via thepeoplesrecord)

(via pipeschapman)

lebeeson:

I have been so blessed to portray such a phenomenal woman as Dana Scully. She has taught me about strength and self-worth and personal power. In early episodes, when I was called upon to address large groups of male FBI agents with authority and self assurance, I felt so scared and weak that my voice would come out high-pitched and shaky. But the more I “acted as if” I was self-assured, the more I felt powerful. And believe it or not, it can be that simple. "Acting as if" is sometimes all it takes to empower oneself, and I have learned to carry this into other areas of my life. When meeting with high-powered directors and producers, or presenting an award at an award ceremony, or doing a talk show; I act as if I am a strong, capable, worthy woman of power. And the more I do this, the more people listen to what I have to say and value my opinion. 
- GA, Girl Boss Foreword

lebeeson:

I have been so blessed to portray such a phenomenal woman as Dana Scully. She has taught me about strength and self-worth and personal power. In early episodes, when I was called upon to address large groups of male FBI agents with authority and self assurance, I felt so scared and weak that my voice would come out high-pitched and shaky. But the more I “acted as if” I was self-assured, the more I felt powerful. And believe it or not, it can be that simple. 

"Acting as if" is sometimes all it takes to empower oneself, and I have learned to carry this into other areas of my life. When meeting with high-powered directors and producers, or presenting an award at an award ceremony, or doing a talk show; I act as if I am a strong, capable, worthy woman of power. And the more I do this, the more people listen to what I have to say and value my opinion. 

- GA, Girl Boss Foreword

(via yellowraincoats)